Rehabilitation and Stroke

 Programme Director:  Dr Harry McNaughton

Taking Charge after Stroke: A person-centred approach


Members of our group have been working for over 15 years on ways of improving community outcomes for people following stroke. Our earlier work suggests that ‘Taking Charge’ is an important concept for people with a range of chronic diseases including stroke. We have previously successfully tested a ‘Take Charge’ intervention in a randomised controlled trial – the Māori; and Pacific Stroke Study (MaPSS). The results of that study showed that for every 10 people who received the ‘Take Charge’ intervention, one extra person was independent at 12 months after the stroke – an equivalent level of effect to intravenous thrombolysis for acute stroke.


MRINZ (principal investigator Harry McNaughton, co-investigators Dr Geoff Green, Ms Anna McRae, Dr Anna Ranta, Dr John Gommans, Assoc Prof William Taylor, Prof Mark Weatherall, Dr Matire Harwood, Dr Carl Hanger) received funding in 2015 from the NZ Health Research Council to test ‘Take Charge’ in a randomised controlled trial of 400 non-Māori;, non-Pacific New Zealanders at 7 DHBs around New Zealand (Auckland, Counties-Manukau, Mid-Central, Hawkes Bay, Capital and Coast, Hutt Valley, Canterbury). The study is underway and by the end of April 2016 we had randomised 67 people and should finish recruitment on time by around July 2017.


Study title: Self-directed rehabilitation randomised controlled trial after stroke: a practical, low cost programme. The Taking Charge after Stroke (TaCAS) Study


Study hypothesis: For non-Māori;, non-Pacific adult New Zealanders discharged to community living after stroke, does a single Take Charge session, or two Take Charge sessions, compared to a control intervention of educational stroke pamphlets, improve health related quality of life 12 months after the stroke?


Results should be available by the end of 2018. Full details of the study are available on the ANZCTR website (www.anzctr.org.au), trial number ACTRN12615001163594.


For general information about the TaCAS study, contact Dr Harry McNaughton (harry.mcnaughton@mrinz.ac.nz). For research assistants, email tacas@mrinz.ac.nz

April 2016, currently recruited: 68

Rehabilitation and Stroke

 Programme Director:  Dr Harry McNaughton

Taking Charge after Stroke: A person-centred approach


Members of our group have been working for over 15 years on ways of improving community outcomes for people following stroke. Our earlier work suggests that ‘Taking Charge’ is an important concept for people with a range of chronic diseases including stroke. We have previously successfully tested a ‘Take Charge’ intervention in a randomised controlled trial – the Māori; and Pacific Stroke Study (MaPSS). The results of that study showed that for every 10 people who received the ‘Take Charge’ intervention, one extra person was independent at 12 months after the stroke – an equivalent level of effect to intravenous thrombolysis for acute stroke.


MRINZ (principal investigator Harry McNaughton, co-investigators Dr Geoff Green, Ms Anna McRae, Dr Anna Ranta, Dr John Gommans, Assoc Prof William Taylor, Prof Mark Weatherall, Dr Matire Harwood, Dr Carl Hanger) received funding in 2015 from the NZ Health Research Council to test ‘Take Charge’ in a randomised controlled trial of 400 non-Māori;, non-Pacific New Zealanders at 7 DHBs around New Zealand (Auckland, Counties-Manukau, Mid-Central, Hawkes Bay, Capital and Coast, Hutt Valley, Canterbury). The study is underway and by the end of April 2016 we had randomised 67 people and should finish recruitment on time by around July 2017.


Study title: Self-directed rehabilitation randomised controlled trial after stroke: a practical, low cost programme. The Taking Charge after Stroke (TaCAS) Study


Study hypothesis: For non-Māori;, non-Pacific adult New Zealanders discharged to community living after stroke, does a single Take Charge session, or two Take Charge sessions, compared to a control intervention of educational stroke pamphlets, improve health related quality of life 12 months after the stroke?


Results should be available by the end of 2018. Full details of the study are available on the ANZCTR website (www.anzctr.org.au), trial number ACTRN12615001163594.


For general information about the TaCAS study, contact Dr Harry McNaughton (harry.mcnaughton@mrinz.ac.nz). For research assistants, email tacas@mrinz.ac.nz

April 2016, currently recruited: 68

Rehabilitation and Stroke

 Programme Director:  Dr Harry McNaughton

Taking Charge after Stroke: A person-centred approach


Members of our group have been working for over 15 years on ways of improving community outcomes for people following stroke. Our earlier work suggests that ‘Taking Charge’ is an important concept for people with a range of chronic diseases including stroke. We have previously successfully tested a ‘Take Charge’ intervention in a randomised controlled trial – the Māori; and Pacific Stroke Study (MaPSS). The results of that study showed that for every 10 people who received the ‘Take Charge’ intervention, one extra person was independent at 12 months after the stroke – an equivalent level of effect to intravenous thrombolysis for acute stroke.


MRINZ (principal investigator Harry McNaughton, co-investigators Dr Geoff Green, Ms Anna McRae, Dr Anna Ranta, Dr John Gommans, Assoc Prof William Taylor, Prof Mark Weatherall, Dr Matire Harwood, Dr Carl Hanger) received funding in 2015 from the NZ Health Research Council to test ‘Take Charge’ in a randomised controlled trial of 400 non-Māori;, non-Pacific New Zealanders at 7 DHBs around New Zealand (Auckland, Counties-Manukau, Mid-Central, Hawkes Bay, Capital and Coast, Hutt Valley, Canterbury). The study is underway and by the end of April 2016 we had randomised 67 people and should finish recruitment on time by around July 2017.


Study title: Self-directed rehabilitation randomised controlled trial after stroke: a practical, low cost programme. The Taking Charge after Stroke (TaCAS) Study


Study hypothesis: For non-Māori;, non-Pacific adult New Zealanders discharged to community living after stroke, does a single Take Charge session, or two Take Charge sessions, compared to a control intervention of educational stroke pamphlets, improve health related quality of life 12 months after the stroke?


Results should be available by the end of 2018. Full details of the study are available on the ANZCTR website (www.anzctr.org.au), trial number ACTRN12615001163594.


For general information about the TaCAS study, contact Dr Harry McNaughton (harry.mcnaughton@mrinz.ac.nz). For research assistants, email tacas@mrinz.ac.nz

April 2016, currently recruited: 68

 
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