Influenza Programme

 Programme Director:  Dr Kyle Perrin

The effect on mortality of antipyretics in the treatment of influenz

Antipyretics are recommended for the symptomatic treatment of influenza infection.  However there is evidence that fever is a protective physiological response, that treating fever secondary to infections may be harmful and that human tropic influenza viruses are variable temperature-sensitive.  In a systematic review and meta-analysis we have identified that in animal models treatment with antipyretics for influenza infection increases the risk of mortality.  There are no randomised controlled placebo-controlled trials of antipyretic use in influenza infection in humans that reported data on mortality and a paucity of clinical data by which to assess their efficacy.  In response to these findings the MRINZ is now undertaking a placebo-controlled randomised trial of paracetamol use in influenza infection. This study is funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand.

Seasonal influenza vaccination effectiveness against pandemic influenza

There has been uncertainty whether the 2009 seasonal influenza vaccination influences the risk of pandemic influenza infection.  In a study based on the Capital & Coast District Health Board Occupational Health Service, we investigated 548 healthcare workers who presented with an influenza-like illness during the influenza pandemic.  We identified that the 2009 seasonal influenza vaccine had no protective effect against pandemic influenza infection.  It was evident that to protect against further waves of the current pandemic influenza or future pandemics in which the influenza virus is antigenically distinct from contemporary seasonal influenza viruses, it would be necessary to vaccinate with a specific pandemic influenza vaccine, or a seasonal influenza vaccine that includes the pandemic influenza serotype.  The study which was funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand, has contributed to influenza vaccination policy in New Zealand.

Influenza Programme

 Programme Director:  Dr Kyle Perrin

The effect on mortality of antipyretics in the treatment of influenz

Antipyretics are recommended for the symptomatic treatment of influenza infection.  However there is evidence that fever is a protective physiological response, that treating fever secondary to infections may be harmful and that human tropic influenza viruses are variable temperature-sensitive.  In a systematic review and meta-analysis we have identified that in animal models treatment with antipyretics for influenza infection increases the risk of mortality.  There are no randomised controlled placebo-controlled trials of antipyretic use in influenza infection in humans that reported data on mortality and a paucity of clinical data by which to assess their efficacy.  In response to these findings the MRINZ is now undertaking a placebo-controlled randomised trial of paracetamol use in influenza infection. This study is funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand.

Seasonal influenza vaccination effectiveness against pandemic influenza

There has been uncertainty whether the 2009 seasonal influenza vaccination influences the risk of pandemic influenza infection.  In a study based on the Capital & Coast District Health Board Occupational Health Service, we investigated 548 healthcare workers who presented with an influenza-like illness during the influenza pandemic.  We identified that the 2009 seasonal influenza vaccine had no protective effect against pandemic influenza infection.  It was evident that to protect against further waves of the current pandemic influenza or future pandemics in which the influenza virus is antigenically distinct from contemporary seasonal influenza viruses, it would be necessary to vaccinate with a specific pandemic influenza vaccine, or a seasonal influenza vaccine that includes the pandemic influenza serotype.  The study which was funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand, has contributed to influenza vaccination policy in New Zealand.

Influenza Programme

 Programme Director:  Dr Kyle Perrin

The effect on mortality of antipyretics in the treatment of influenz

Antipyretics are recommended for the symptomatic treatment of influenza infection.  However there is evidence that fever is a protective physiological response, that treating fever secondary to infections may be harmful and that human tropic influenza viruses are variable temperature-sensitive.  In a systematic review and meta-analysis we have identified that in animal models treatment with antipyretics for influenza infection increases the risk of mortality.  There are no randomised controlled placebo-controlled trials of antipyretic use in influenza infection in humans that reported data on mortality and a paucity of clinical data by which to assess their efficacy.  In response to these findings the MRINZ is now undertaking a placebo-controlled randomised trial of paracetamol use in influenza infection. This study is funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand.

Seasonal influenza vaccination effectiveness against pandemic influenza

There has been uncertainty whether the 2009 seasonal influenza vaccination influences the risk of pandemic influenza infection.  In a study based on the Capital & Coast District Health Board Occupational Health Service, we investigated 548 healthcare workers who presented with an influenza-like illness during the influenza pandemic.  We identified that the 2009 seasonal influenza vaccine had no protective effect against pandemic influenza infection.  It was evident that to protect against further waves of the current pandemic influenza or future pandemics in which the influenza virus is antigenically distinct from contemporary seasonal influenza viruses, it would be necessary to vaccinate with a specific pandemic influenza vaccine, or a seasonal influenza vaccine that includes the pandemic influenza serotype.  The study which was funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand, has contributed to influenza vaccination policy in New Zealand.

 
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